Tech Fatigue, a CEO’s Perspective

October 18, 2016

As the CEO of a Managed Service Provider, I talk to a lot of people about their technology. Through all of these conversations, I am noticing a trend – everyone seems to be suffering from some sort of tech fatigue.

Tech fatigue is a feeling of being overwhelmed and helpless when it comes to technology.

It’s completely understandable. There are so many options when choosing anything tech related. There are also so many security measures to keep up on.

According to a survey done by TripWire, the majority of the general public has given up on cyber security. A lot of the participants cited that security was a lot to keep up with and they get tired of remembering or creating passwords.   We’ve thrown up our hands with anxiety.

At GadellNet, our clients have experienced an average 14% profitability growth YOY. We attribute this to using technology in a strategic manner that aligns with their unique goals. This increase in profitability is possible for many small businesses if they can get past their tech fatigue, which is leaving many small businesses vulnerable, and charge forward with a well laid technology plan.

 

Consider this:

1 in 4 small businesses have little to no understanding of cyber security issues

YET

71% of data breaches target small businesses

 

Everyone seems to know they need to keep up with security, but they don’t know where to start. Unfortunately, your company could suffer for it.

Creating good habits for yourself and your employees is a great place to begin. Know what the safe behaviors are and use them regularly. When you become confused or overwhelmed, you won’t fall back on bad habits. Training your employees on these good habits will pay dividends in the end. Well-trained employees are key to keeping hackers at bay. If they know the difference between a phishing email and a legitimate email, for example, they won’t click on a malicious link or attachment.

 

Consider this:

 

73% of users have the same password for multiple sites

But

Social Engineering is the most common way for hackers to get personal information

 

In any one day, a single employee might have to update your password, again, reboot your system so the firewall is up-to-date, and login to about 12 different applications all with different usernames and passwords.

Strong passwords are essential. Helping your employees by investing in a password manager can really help. Passwords are one of those things many people get lazy on and something hackers will take advantage of. A password manager will securely store your passwords and even generate random, complex passwords when you need to create a new one.

 

Consider this:

The average U.S. business deals with 10,000 security alerts per day

But

Only 21% of IT professionals are confident that their information security technologies can mitigate risk

Lack of resources and a lack of tech budget planning are rampant in most industries. Planning for technology is essential. Not only can it aid you in getting to your business goals, but the right tech budget planning can ensure that your security measures are adequate. Many find it difficult to know exactly where to invest their money with so many tech security necessities out there.

 

This is where a tech consultant can be of help. No matter what your budget, they can assist you in creating the best plan to keep your company safe from cybercrime.

 

Take a look at some common bundles for a small business at any stage:

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